Your mind and mental health is just as important as your body in boxing, so how do we keep exercising our brain to keep it in tip top condition?

1.SLEEP WELL
The brain needs just as much recovery as the body. A lack of sleep can make you tired and lazy during the day so your ability to process new information diminishes.
If you wake up feeling like you can barely make a cup of tea, then how is your mind meant to navigate the rest of the day? Get those ZZZ’s and power through your day like a champion.

2. READ ALL THE BOOKS!
Reading is just as powerful, if not more so than watching and hearing information.
What’s more, it is kind of relaxing to just take a moment to yourself absorbing information the old fashioned way, rather than the hyper-speed of the internet and podcasts.

3. PLAY GAMES 🙂
Release your inner child and challenge your mind with games that make your brain tick such as Scrabble and Charades. There are plenty of memory games you could be practising on the bus instead of mindlessly scrolling through Facebook feeds. Chess and card games are great for mental strategy.

4. RELY ON YOUR OWN INSTINCTS
It sure is convenient these days with all the apps that tell you how to do everything or get everywhere, however what happens when technology is not there to save you?
You might be lost in a dark alley or bush where there is no reception…then you will have no choice but to follow your gut instincts.
Instead of using your GPS as much, just follow road signs or use a map. Yes, it is a bit unsettling at first, but it will be easier and better for your knowledge in the long run.

5. HANG OUT WITH GEEKS
Our personalities and characteristics are often shaped by who we choose to associate with. If we only hang around with ignorant bumpkins, they can begin to have an influence on our way of thinking.
On the flipside, conversing with people who can hold an intellectual conversation and are passionate to learn, will surely train your mind and expand your horizons.

“A single conversation across the table with a wise man is better than ten years mere study of books.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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